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Posted on 10 Янв 201818

Adam Smith - Capital Gain

Adam Smith - Capital Gain
Adam Smith FRSA (16 June 1723 NS (5 June 1723 OS) – 17 July 1790) was a Scottish economist, philosopher, and author. He was a moral philosopher, a pioneer of ...

In his later life, he took a tutoring position that allowed him to travel throughout Europe, where he met other intellectual leaders of his day. Adam Smith considered the teaching at Glasgow to be far superior to that at Oxford, which he found intellectually stifling. The minor planet 12838 Adamsmith was named in his memory. Following the publication of The Theory of Moral Sentiments, Smith became so popular that many wealthy students left their schools in other countries to enroll at Glasgow to learn under Smith. After the publication of The Theory of Moral Sentiments, Smith began to give more attention to jurisprudence and economics in his lectures and less to his theories of morals.

Five years later, as a member of the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh when it received its royal charter, he automatically became one of the founding members of the Royal Society of Edinburgh,[44] and from 1787 to 1789 he occupied the honorary position of Lord Rector of the University of Glasgow. After graduating, he delivered a successful series of public lectures at Edinburgh, leading him to collaborate with David Hume during the Scottish Enlightenment. Smith returned home that year to Kirkcaldy, and he devoted much of the next ten years to his magnum opus. Smith obtained a professorship at Glasgow teaching moral philosophy, and during this time he wrote and published The Theory of Moral Sentiments. When Smith was not studying on his own, his time at Oxford was not a happy one, according to his letters.

On his death bed, Smith expressed disappointment that he had not achieved more. As well as teaching Moyes, Smith secured the patronage of David Hume and Thomas Reid in the young man's education. According to William Robert Scott, "The Oxford of [Smith's] time gave little if any help towards what was to be his lifework. For example, Smith lectured that the cause of increase in national wealth is labour, rather than the nation's quantity of gold or silver, which is the basis for mercantilism, the economic theory that dominated Western European economic policies at the time. Smith entered the University of Glasgow when he was fourteen and studied moral philosophy under Francis Hutcheson. He died in the northern wing of Panmure House in Edinburgh on 17 July 1790 after a painful illness and was buried in the Canongate Kirkyard. He was a moral philosopher, a pioneer of political economy, and was a key figure during the Scottish Enlightenment era. There he befriended Henry Moyes, a young blind man who showed precocious aptitude. In Book V, Chapter II of The Wealth of Nations, Smith wrote: "In the University of Oxford, the greater part of the public professors have, for these many years, given up altogether even the pretence of teaching. Smith laid the foundations of classical free market economic theory.

Antarctica :: Antarctic Treaty System
Antarctica :: Antarctic Treaty System

Statistical Techniques | Statistical Mechanics

Near the end of his time there, Smith began suffering from shaking fits, probably the symptoms of a nervous breakdown. In 1740 Smith was the graduate scholar presented to undertake postgraduate studies at Balliol College, Oxford, under the Snell Exhibition. He died in the northern wing of Panmure House in Edinburgh on 17 July 1790 after a painful illness and was buried in the Canongate Kirkyard. Smith was controversial in his own day and his general approach and writing style were often satirised by Tory writers in the moralising tradition of William Hogarth and Jonathan Swift. Adam Smith considered the teaching at Glasgow to be far superior to that at Oxford, which he found intellectually stifling.

According to William Robert Scott, "The Oxford of [Smith's] time gave little if any help towards what was to be his lifework. Here, Smith developed his passion for liberty, reason, and free speech. Five years later, as a member of the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh when it received its royal charter, he automatically became one of the founding members of the Royal Society of Edinburgh,[44] and from 1787 to 1789 he occupied the honorary position of Lord Rector of the University of Glasgow. After graduating, he delivered a successful series of public lectures at Edinburgh, leading him to collaborate with David Hume during the Scottish Enlightenment. Smith is also reported to have complained to friends that Oxford officials once discovered him reading a copy of David Hume's Treatise on Human Nature, and they subsequently confiscated his book and punished him severely for reading it.

Smith entered the University of Glasgow when he was fourteen and studied moral philosophy under Francis Hutcheson. Smith returned home that year to Kirkcaldy, and he devoted much of the next ten years to his magnum opus. The Wealth of Nations was published in 1776 and was an instant success, selling out its first edition in only six months. In his later life, he took a tutoring position that allowed him to travel throughout Europe, where he met other intellectual leaders of his day. He is best known for two classic works: The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759), and An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776). In 2005, The Wealth of Nations was named among the 100 Best Scottish Books of all time. The minor planet 12838 Adamsmith was named in his memory. Smith studied social philosophy at the University of Glasgow and at Balliol College, Oxford, where he was one of the first students to benefit from scholarships set up by fellow Scot, John Snell. After the publication of The Theory of Moral Sentiments, Smith began to give more attention to jurisprudence and economics in his lectures and less to his theories of morals. For example, Smith lectured that the cause of increase in national wealth is labour, rather than the nation's quantity of gold or silver, which is the basis for mercantilism, the economic theory that dominated Western European economic policies at the time.

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